Thanks to two wonderful ladies we present the work Completed and written by Margaret and Allison, February 2005 Kind regards

Michael B Goodrick

THE GOODRICKS FROM NORFOLK TO N.Z.

THE GOODRICKS FROM NORFOLK TO N.Z.

 George Goodrick

 Born 28.4.1782-83 in Swaffham Norfolk.

Married Elizabeth Crome 25.July.1805 in Swaffham, Norfolk. With the consent of her father as she was a minor. Baptised circa 1784 in Beestone, Norfolk.

His business card reads;
GOODRICK

Bookseller, Binder and Stationer. London St, Swaffham.

Respectfully informs his friends and the Public in general, that he has opened a convenient Shop, in the above branches, and humbly solicits their countenance and encouragement, which he will make it his study to deserve. He has also a CIRCULATING LIBRARY, which he intends occasionally to enlarge, suitable to the encouragement he shall Receive from his friends. Catalogues of the Books to be had when required. Periodical publication- regularly served.July.12.1805.

In 1841 and 1851 census they lived at 54 Friar St, Kings Lynn, and he was a Compositor and Pressman..

They had 8 children, William Robert, George John, Henry Samuel, Frederick Francis, Hannah, Abraham, Ann, and Susan.

George died 8.2.1865, Wyatt St, Kings Lynn, aged 83 years of apoplexy.

Elizabeth died 5.1.1858, Smiths Court, Bridge St, Kings Lynn, aged 74 years of cancer of the womb.

 

George John

 

Baptised 20.4.1811 Swaffham, Norfolk.

Married Jane Sellars 13.11.1836, in the parish of St Margaret’s, Kings Lynn, Norfolk.

Witnessed by his father G Goodrick and his sister Susan Goodrick. 15 years old,

George John was a coal porter.

They had 3 children, Charles Francis, William, and Edward.

In the 1841 1851 and 1861 census they lived at 141 Providence Row, Kings Lynn, Norfolk.

Charles and William were classed as errant boys in the census.

Jane Goodrick died 27.8.1843 aged 34 years from decline.

Son Edward died 1843.

George John then married Sarah Parks 27.10.844, born circa 1823 at Grimstone, Norfolk. Daughter of William Parks a bricklayer.

Charles and William were educated at a church school and around the age of 14 Charles left home and went to sea. Family stories implied it was because of his stepmother.

In a letter written 1890 to Charles F Goodrick 1st (who now lived in New Zealand) by his uncle William Robert Goodrick, William remarked that “we never hear or see Sarah, she is a very odd queer woman.”!!!!

This letter from the home of Ron Goodrick , Waitara. NZ.

Written to Charles Frances Goodrick 1st, living in NZ .

By William Robert Goodrick

 TILNEY, 14. 4 1890.

MY DEAR NEPHEW,

IT GAVE ME GREAT PLEASURE TO RECEIVE YOUR LAST LETTER AS THINGS APPEAR TO BE BETTER IN YOUR COUNTRY AND I HOPE YOU WILL ENJOY OR HAVE ENJOYED YOUR JUBILEE TREAT.

WELL 2 YEARS AGO WE HAD WHAT WAS CALLED THE QUEENS ??

BUT IT DID NOT MOVE ME A BIT FOR IF SHE AND ALL HER CREW WERE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA I SHOULD NOT BE A BIT SORRY.

THEIR COST IS SCANDALOUS AND WHEN WE SEE THE POVERTY AMONG THE PEOPLE, IT IS A DREADFUL THING , BUT I THINK THERE WILL BE A RECONING DAY BEFORE LONG AS THE PEOPLE BECOME BETTER EDUCATED THEY WILL SEND BETTER MEN TO PARLIAMENT. I FEEL GLAD THAT THE WORKING MAN IS MAKING HIMSELF HEARD, BY THE STRIKES OVER ENGLAND AND ELSEWHERE.

WELL I HOPE THIS WILL FIND YOU AND YOURS ALL WELL.

I AM JUST RECOVERING FROM A 10 WEEKS ILLNESS ALTHOUGH MUST HAVE GONE.. BUT FOR THE GOOD LORD HAS REVIVED ME AGAIN BUT I CAN HARDLY WALK. I AM SO WEAK MY POOR WIFE ??? VERY ILL INDEED. I AM GLAD TO HEAR YOU HAVE YOUR SERVICE, I HOPE IT WILL PROVE A BLESSING TO YOU ALL. I FOUND COMFORT OF RELIGION ON WHAT I EXPECTED A DEATH BED ON THE 11TH., INSTANT.

FRANK PAID ME A VISIT FROM YORK, HE IS AN INTELLIGENT CHAP AND I BELIEVE A GOOD CHRISTIAN, BUT HE IS A VERY CURIOUS LOOKING FELLOW, HIS MOTHR DID NOT COME, BUT IS IN MIDDLEY HEALTH.

SUSAN AND ROBERT CAWTHORNE ARE WELL BUT HE CANNOT DO ANY WORK,QUITE ??? UP.

I HAVE BEEN OBLIGED TO GIVE UP MY APPOINTMENTS, A SCHOOL BOARD CLERK ,TAXGATHERING AND OVERSEESHIP TO??.

NOW I FEEL BETTER TIMES HANGS HEAVY ON MY HANDS BUT WE CANNOT WORK FOREVER BUT I MUST CONFESS I MISS THE MONEY, BUT GOD WILLS BE DONE

LYNN FAIR WAS LAST TUESDAY, EVERTHING IS DEAR IN ENGLAND EXCEPT COR.. SHEEP ARE AWFUL, HOGGETS RUBBISH AND WORTH 45 TO 50 PENCE EACH, THOSE THAT ARE FAT MOVE UP TO 80 PENCE EACH. EWES AND LAMBS FROM 65 TO 75 PENCE AND A COUPLE AT THE FAIR.

OUR BUTCHERS IN THE LARGE TOWNS ARE DOING WELL WITH YOUR MUTTON AS ALL THE BEST IS SOLD AS ENGLISH, ABOUT 9 OR 10 POUND AND FOREIGN MEAT IS QUITE A GODSEND TO THE BUTCHERS ALTHOUGH NOT TO THE CONSUMER.

LYNN AS A TOWN IS A VERY POOR PLACE AND A GREAT MANY FAILURES GOING ON. WE NEVER HEAR FROM OR SEE SARAH, SHE IS A VERY ODD QUEER WOMAN. WELL I MUST CLOSE MY BUDGET NOW. WISHING YOU AND YOURS EVERY BLESSING AND A MEETING HEREAFTER IN THE BETTER LAND, IS A PRAYER OF YOUR AFFECTIONATE UNCLE,

W.R.GOODRICK

P.S. AS A CURIOSITY I HAVE ENCLOSED NOTES OF A SERMON BY MY GRANDFATHER’S BROTHER GEORGE, HE WAS A GOOD MAN AND DONE A DEAL OF GOOD IN 1773.

 

This is the sermon,

 Folkstone, Sept, 12th, 1773.

Afternoon and evening.

Eph.3.8.

Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given.

That I should preach among the gentiles the unsearchable rich of Christ.

Langham. Feb.6th,1774

Morning and afternoon

Swaffham Sept 1st,

Olney, August 28,1774.

In discoursing further on these words I shall endeavour to share,

Something of the unsearchable riches of Christ.

The riches of Christ as God, lie in the perfection of his nature, in the works of his hand in his empire and

Unto me is this grace given.

This favour bestowed Roman 15.16.

  1. 1.    Cor..2.12. (13.11.)

But again with respect to the Children of God this is a gift of discriminating

Grace. We may would to God the Lord’s people were all prophets .

Yet it is not like to be

This great honour is reserved pepels.( Acts 9.15) who were predestines thereto

Gal.1.15.

All the saints are not thus dignified the apostle saw this such an honour as made

Honour as made him lose sight of himself. So do all his

No more things are to be learned in the schools. The arts and sciences are men

And things are but not Christ

The Christian Ministry men can receive from none but Christ himself and of him . as a gift.

Jesus puts this gift into his ministering servants as you would put treasure into

Earthen vessel therefore it is said Cor.4.7.

But as it is a gift so in it a gift of grace mark the one of the text in which the

Apostle says

Of this covenant engagements Pial.8.3

Of his fulfilling the arduous conditions. John, 17.4.

By which he has made a divine atonement John,1.2 (Romans 3.25.)

Opened a Fountain to the house of David. Zec, 13.1. 1 Cor, 6.11.

Provided Grace for the Saints in order that they might persevere

The riches of his glory Phil .4.19. Thep @.12. Phi. 4.19.

Dominion over all and the “nevemies of glory, which result from the Thence ,and theses riches are underived and incommunicable, yet are ineffable

And inconceivable.

But the riches of which Apostle here speaks I apprehend to be his riches

As mediator, and in the person of the elect .( tho thee are his riches and profession.Pial.2.8.) But the riches of his grace that is laid up in him for them. See Ephe.1.7. Now let us consider this redemption in the reveral parts of it and so it will be amazing riches indeed.

The riches of his grace.

These rich things blessed be God communicable. Satisfying and lasting.

Tho they are unsearchable to the natural man.

Yea they can’t be fully investigated by believers themselves

That these unchable riches of Christ are given to his Minister.

Observe they are given to them the Apostle did not attain to the knowledge of these things at the feet of Garnaliel (Acts 22.3)

Tho educated by him.

 

My sister, Allison holds the original sermon notes.

 

Charles’s brother William may have married a Susan Flatt and had a family of 3 children.

 

Charles Francis.

 

Born 3.3.1838, in Kings Lynn, Norfolk.

He came to New Zealand when he was about 20 years old as a Second Mate on the ship “British Queen”. Arriving in Dunedin in 1859. They were carrying the first mining equipment for the Gold Fields of New Zealand.

He apparently jumped ship in Wellington and on the 25th February 1859 with 2 mates set out for Greytown, walking over the Rimutaka Hill and across the plains of scrub and fern. He considered this the hardest walk he had ever done especially wearing heavy sea boots.

We heard from his daughter Rose that he was carrying his sea chest as well.

Charles met 2 pitsawers Jim Farmer and Bob Hunter and went with them pit sawing for Mr. Charles Bidwell at Tutu for about 2 months, for timber to build his house. He then went to work sawing for Mr. W O Williams at Kaiwaiwai and stayed on in that district all his life.

Charles and W Jones cut the first pile for the Queens Wharf in Wellington about the year 1862.

 On Margaret’s enquiry at the City and Sea Museum of Wellington in 2004, she received this reply.

 Dear Mrs Welch

 Regarding the information about Mr C F Goodrick you sent us which mentions the building of Queens Wharf, I have found a brief reference to this in the book Wellington Harbour by David Johnson, published in 1996.

 This verifies that the piles for the wharf came from the Wairarapa, though it doesn’t give more details.

 Queen’s Wharf was commissioned by the Wellington Provincial Council and built by McLaggan and Thomson for an approximate cost of 16,000 pounds.  Their tender was accepted in November 1861.  The timber wharf was originally 550 feet long and initially known as the Deep Water Wharf, as it was the first wharf of this size which could take larger vessels.  The first piles arrived from the Wairarapa in February 1862.  After a false start the first piles were successfully driven in on 28 April 1862.  The wharf was actually completed in late 1863, though vessels were using the uncompleted wharf for several months previously.

 I found the Goodrick document most interesting and have added it to my research files. 

 Charles married Jemima Smith 9.9.1866 at “Morrisons Bush”, Featherston, Wairarapa.

Jemima was baptized 24.10.1847 born Greytown.

Parents Thomas and Mary Ann Smith Kaiwaiwai.

Thomas Smith and Mary Ann Williams both sailing out to NZ with their parents Frederick and ? Smith and James and Katherine Williams (nee Osborne from St Issey Cornwall) and families on the Duke of Roxburgh.

Leaving from Cornwall England 5.10.1839 arriving Port Nicholson New Zealand 8.2.1840.

Thomas and Mary Ann then married 1840, both 19 years old .Pioneering settlers.

Charles and Jemima had 13 children,

William Robert, Amelia Browne, Jane`(Jeanie), Charles Francis 2nd, John Thomas (Jack), Anne, Mary Ellen (Nellie), Kate Mary, Eva Alice, Arthur George, Violet Isabel, Frank and Rosalie (Rose).

Jemima was a little lady, and had all her 13 confinements at home without the aid of a Dr.The last baby, Rose, being born when Jemima was aged 49 years.

Charles took up land for dairy farming , 103 acres and 2 roods more or less situate in block V111 of the Wairarapa Survey District and being Section 76 and parts of Section 78 of the Moroa Block situated each side of Tahatara Road Kaiwaiwai, after they were married.

Stan Gibbs remembers the evening when, with others he took part in a little joke played on Mr.Goodrick. The Goodricks arrived for church by horse and buggy, and the horse was unharnessed and tied to a nearby tree. While all were seated in church, the lads took the buggy outside the gate and poked the shafts thru the fence. They then harnessed the horse up again on the other side of the fence. The look of surprise on the face of Mr. Goodrick was worth the trouble. When Stan’s father heard of the incident he firmly questioned a red-faced lad, who tried to deny any participation. No doubt he received a reprimand.

Charles was a founder of the Featherston Co-operative Dairy Company.

They farmed there till 1908 when Charles aged 70 years retired and shifted into South Featherston.

Charles died 17.12.1930, aged 92 years, of cerebral haemorrhage 3 days.

6 days later Jemima died 23.12.1930 aged 83 years of carcinoma of the stomach 6 months, heart failure 3 days and are both buried at Featherston Cemetery.

It was said she could not live without him after 64 years of being married.

 C.F.GOODRICK, 1st.CELEBRATING 50 YEARS IN NZ.

C 1909.

 

Just over 50 years ago today, Mr C.F.Goodrick arrived in the Wairarapa where he has remained ever since. He was born at King’s Lynn, March 3rd, 1838, arrived in Wellington when in his 21st year.

On the 25th, February 1859 he, in the company of Tom Boyce, and another , left Wellington at 10.0 o’clock in the morning and reached Nat Shirley’s at the Fern Ground, near where Mr. Benge now lives at Mangaroa. Here they stayed the night in an old Maori whare and made their supper out of a basket of potatoes kindly given by Mr Shirley. In the morning, Shirley advised them to clear out as quickly as possible so as not to cause trouble with the Maoris as the whare in which they had slept was tabooed.

On the 26th February they reached the foot of the Rimutuka and entered for the first time the Wairarapa Valley. A call was made at Burling’s, but as the provisions were short all that could be got was a bottle of cold tea. That night they slept in a roadman’s whare at the foot of the hill. Next mornings tramp bought them to Tauherenikau where a meal was got from Tom Hales, who kept the hotel there. Hales directed them on the road to Greytown, and in those days this walk to Greytown was a great undertaking, as the whole of the plain was a mass of scrub and fern ,which covered the boulders which can now be seen. Mr Goodrick considers this tramp to be the hardest he had ever done in his whole life , more so as he had heavy sea-boots on at the time. That night was spent with Mr. Smith who had just come out in the Oliver Lange. As Mr Smith had a contract for making the road across the Waihenga Flat he sent the travellers down to the camp to his mate to put them on. When they arrived there they found they could not be put on as enough hands had already been engaged.

Mr.Goodrick then met two pit sawers, Jim Farmer and Bob Hunter , and went with them pit sawing for the late Mr Bidwell at Tutu, for timber to build his house. After about 2 months of this , he went on sawing for W.O. Williams at Kaiwaiwai, and in this district he has remained ever since.

In those days Featherston consisted of one public house,Burlings at the foot of the hill, Blades tannery, near where Mr W. Buckeridge is now and the old land office on the present Town Board Office site. These were all the houses to be seen till Tauherenikau was reached. The place was nothing but scrub, flax, boulders and bush, with no roads or bridges..

The only private house about was the late Thomas Fenton’s on the banks of the Tauherenikau River, almost opposite the present Dairy owned by the Donald Estate on the Kahutara Road, Other houses in the district were Mr. W. O. Williams, Kaiwaiwai, now residing in Greytown, and the late Mr. Bright of Tutu, who kept the only blacksmith shop there.

The early settlers had to put up with great difficulties and inconveniences.

In those days the only road was the bed of the river and would be followed up for some time and strike off out onto the plain. It was no unusual thing to have to yoke up three bullocks , to get an empty butter keg and a bag of flour and often then the trip might be made for nothing.

To get the mail , a trip had to be made to Greytown, and this used to be done about once a month, as there were no horses to ride and the tramp was a hard and rough one. The road over the Rimutuka was very good and kept in order by a number of men stationed at intervals. The late Mr Kelly was one of those who looked after this road, from Mr Benton’s right through Greytown and Carterton, up to Taratahi there was nothing but bush except the main road to Greytown.

In Greytown there was a hotel called The Rising Sun, kept by the father of Mr Thomas Kempton. He was known there as the Mayor of Greytown. This place has since burnt down.

Mr Goodrick and a mate called W. Jones, cut the first pile for the Queen’s Wharf in Wellington about the year 1862. These two broke the first side down in the pit and the late Mr. James Donald, took the three other side off at the bench. Mr Thomas Kempton having hauled it to the pit. The reason why the rest of the piles was not supplied , was that timber could not be got long enough to allow a foot square of heart on the top end.

During the Maori War, Mr Goodrick belonged to the Greytown and Featherston Corp, and had to drill 3 times a week. Drill was held on the ground where the Oddfellows Hall now stands in Featherston. Out of all the old settlers around Featherston there only remains Mr Goodrick, J. Vickery, who has been here 51 yrs, Mr and Mrs W.O. Williams, Thomas Smith, who is nearly 90 yrs old.. That old veteran settler is still alive , although not in the district now. The following are some of the settlers in the early days, who have since joined the majority, Mr an Mrs John Russell Kelly, Lower Hutt V alley, Gillies, P. Hume, McMasters, Smith, Revins, C.R. Bidwell, Morrison, R. Bright, Henry Jackson, Jo Tocker, R. Yule, C. Cundy, F. Burt, James Donald , Thomas Fenton, Walter Hodder, R. Kelly, E. Harris ,Lucas, C.Fenwick, Joe Hodder, Vennal Abbott, R. Blade, Richard Williams and John Feast.

In those days five shillings a day was the wage and sometimes a day consisted of 16 hrs, there was no loafing and no unions then. Honest work and honest pay were the order of the day. Our friend worked for 14 shillings a week milking cows and splitting firewood, for a Mr W.O.Williams for a good time.

When the late Mr. James Donald took over the timber mill and raised the wages sixpence a day, to five and sixpence, all hands thought they were on the road to making fortunes.

Mr Goodricks, wife who was a Smith, daughter of Mr. T. Smith , Kaiwaiwai, was born at the Hutt, As issue of this marriage there are children and these are living at various places from Stratford to Mirama.

Today, the 50th anniversary of this colonist’s arrival in the Wairarapa, is being spent in Greytown with his two friends, Mr and Mrs W.O.Williams who he looks upon as his second parents.

 

Recorded from the newspaper cutting held by Edna Goodrick, grand-daughter of C.F. Goodrick. Now held by her son, Graham Palmer of Tauranga.

William Robert.

Born 1867, Kaiwaiwai. Deaf all his life.

Married Isabella Maud Gyde.

William died 1963.

 

Amelia Browne

Born 20.11.1869 Kaiwaiwai.

Married Joseph Handley.

Amelia died 5.1960.

 

Jane (Jeanie)

Born 10.1.1871, Kaiwaiwai.

Unmarried.

 

Charles Francis.

Born 25.6.1873, Kaiwaiwai.

Married Mary (Polly) Willis, 1.10.1901 in South Featherston.

Charles died 3.8.1953, in Hastings Hawkes Bay.

Mary died 29.7.1944. Private Hospital, Knight St, ( now Cranford Hospice) Hastings.

 

John Thomas.( Jack)

Born 3.1875, Kaiwaiwai.

Married Annie Louisa Mills, 12.6.1901 in Eltham.

Jack died 1950 in New Plymouth from an accident.

 

 

Anne Catherine.

Born 9.1877 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Fawcett.

 

Mary Ellen (Nellie)

Born 9.1879 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Fred Lyall.

27 Beauchamp Street,

Karori

 

April 9th, 1929.

Dear Jeanie,

I have been down to see Mr Hemsley, and gave him the slip of paper you sent to read. He say’s that is the same tree, the seed of which was planted by Sir Harry Goodrick. He was visiting Dorset and of all the apples he thought this one the best, and slipped a few of the pips in his waistcoat pocket, took them back to Ribston and planted the seed and that is how it is called Ribston Pippin and is the parent tree , so Mr Hemsley says, of all the other pippins. He knows the tree quite well as he used to live in the village next to the Ribston Estate. Sir Harry Goodrick got into financial difficulties and sold the estate to Sir John Dent, who evidently had plenty of money for he built a beautiful church , put one of his own sons in it as Pastor and Mr Hemsley says, still lives there he thinks.

The Ribston Estate is a beautiful place and covers many acres of county and joins Goldsborough Hall , the home of Princess Mary and Viscount Lascelles.

Does Dad remember the name of Hemsley at all. There are numbers of Hemsleys in Yorkshire,he wondered if Dad would know the name.Tell Kate I hope to see her soon and to ring me as soon as she gets to her new home

Love from

Nell.

 

This is written by CFG’s daughter Nell, who married Fred Lyall

Dad”‘ referred to would be CFG 1st,

The other 2 , Jeanie and Kate being CFG’s daughters and sister to Nell the writer.

I understand from David Lyall a descendant, that Nell was a great writer..

Margaret Welch, 13.9.2004.

 

Kate Mary.

Born 9.1881 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Rev Charles Roberts, 3.4.1912 in South Featherston Methodist Church.

Kate died 1955.

 

Eva Alice.

Born 12.1883 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Alphonse (Ally) Wood.

No children.

 

 

Arthur George.

Born 9.11.1886 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Ellen (Nell) Bishop, in Otorohanga.

Arthur died 18.12.1970.

 

Violet Isabel.

Born 7.2.1888 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Aaron Frederick Simmonds.

2nd marriage to Charles Henderson.

Violet died 31.3.1975 in Oanui Taranaki.

 

 

VIOLET ISOBEL HENDERSON (nee GOODRICK)

 

 

Violet Isobel GOODRICK was born in Featherston, New Zealand on 7th Feb 1888. Her parent’s, Charles and Jemima Goodrick, had a family of five sons and eight daughters. Charles Francis Goodrick was born on 3rd March, 1838 in Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England and he came to New Zealand when he was 19yrs old as a Second Mate on the ship “British Queen”, arriving in Dunedin in 1859. The “British Queen” was carrying the first mining equipment for the Gold Fields of New Zealand. At that time his place of residence was given as Swaffham in Cambridgeshire, England.

He jumped ship in Wellington, and got a contract helping other seamen pit saw the Piles for the Wellington wharfs. Charles later droving a flock of sheep for Mr J O Bidwell, along the difficult coastal route, from Wellington to the Wairarapa. He then worked for a number of years for Bidwell, until he could build himself a pit - sawn cottage, and take up land at Kahatara Road (Nth of Lake Wairarapa) where he successfully farmed until 1908. He married at Morrison's Bush, on 9th August 1866, Jemima SMITH (born 24 Oct 1847), the daughter of Thomas Smith and Mary Ann Williams of Greytown. On their wedding day, Charles was 28yr and Jemima 19yr. . The Smiths were pioneer settlers of the Moroa and Kaiwaiwai areas of the Wairarapa. Thomas had arrived in Wellington on 8th Feb 1840, aged 19yrs, on the ship “Duke of Roxburgh”. Together with his parents, two brothers, and one sister, from Plymouth in England.

Charles and Jemima had 13 children: -- Amelia (Millie); William; John (Jack); Charles; Nell; Anne; Kate; Jinnie (after his mother - Jane Sellars of Swaffham); Arthur; Eva; Violet; Frank and Rose.

(Rose was born in 1896 when her mother and father were 49yr and 58yr).

In about 1912, when 70yr old, Charles and Jemima retired from the farm, to live on South Featherston Road, in South Featherston township near the school and Dairy Factory. Charles took a keen interest in Public Affairs, and was a Director of the Featherston Dairy Company, and also for sometime a member and chairman of the Kaiwaiwai School Committee.

Charles died on 17th Dec 1930 aged 92yr, and it is said that Jemima “could not live without him”, and she died six days later on 23rd Dec 1930, aged 83yrs They are both buried at Featherston Cemetery.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------

 

When Violet was 22yr old she married Aaron Fredrick SIMMONDS (born 7th March 1880) at Featherston on 5th Sept 1910. The Simmonds family had a farm on the northern shores of Lake Wairarapa, and Aaron and Violet had 18 acres of this land at the southern corner of the South Featherston and Ashby Roads (in 2004 the house and sheds were still standing)

In April of 1911, when Violet was three months pregnant, and Aaron and she had only been married seven months, Aaron was involved in a serious farm accident while ploughing on their farm. It seems that the horses were startled, and while Aaron was trying to control them, he was dragged under the plough and suffered severe head injuries. Oswald JANSEN (Avril’s husband) later found out that a jealous former suitor of Violets had fired a rifle shot over the horses, causing them to bolt. .

Aaron after being hospitalised, recovered from his injuries, but because of “delusional insanity and hallucination of hearing” he was admitted to the Porirua Mental Hospital on 8th August 1911. It was here that he remained for 31 yrs until his death on 25th August 1942 at aged 62 yrs. He is buried in the Cemetery next to the hospital.

Their daughter Avril Fredrica was born in Featherston two months later on 1st October 1911. Violet made the two-day train journey to Porirua, via Wellington, to see Aaron in his confinement. Avril remembered that she was taken to see her father at least twice, and that Aaron knew whom she was.

Unable to run the farm by herself, Violet moved back in with her parents at the South Featherston settlement, and the farm was taken over by the Public Trust Office. It was here that Violet brought up Avril until she was about 3yrs old. However she was eventually forced to seek housekeeping jobs on farms in the Wairarapa area, and this required her to move around. . It was then, (when Avril was about 6yrs), that her parents Charles and Jemima, suggested that the child should have a more stable environment, and so she returned to the South Featherston home where she was looked after by the maiden Aunts Jinnie and Rose, and went to the local school across the road.

In about 1919 the marriage between Aaron and Violet was annulled. (Violet was 31yr, and Avril 8yr). Avril was very fond of her Grandparents and Aunts, and lived with them until she went to work. She travelled each day from Featherston to Masterton on the train to attend the Wairarapa High School for three years, and a Technical School for two. She later boarded in Masterton when she was apprenticed as a tailoress under Miss Bagshore of the Alterations Dept in Hugo’s Store. She worked for Hugo’s until she was married on 7th Feb 1934 (aged 23yrs) to Oswald Lawrence JANSEN. The marriage was on her mother’s birthday, but Violet was unable to attend, as she had by then met and married Charles Harvey HENDERSON, and had moved to Rahotu in Taranaki. She was also looking after a new baby (Eileen - 9 months), and four other children under 10yrs of age.

Charlie and Violet met when they were both working for the Booth Family at the property of “Middlerun”, near Carterton. Violet was employed as a housekeeper and Charlie was a cowman/gardener on the property. They were married at Carterton, Wairarapa on 22nd Feb 1923 (Charlie was 25yr and Violet 35yr). Avril was present as the flowrgirl at the wedding, and would have been about 12yrs old.

This is written by Ross McClandish , Australia , a grandson of Violet.

 

Frank.

Born 13.6.1891 in Kaiwaiwai.

Married Ellen Munroe, 1914.

2nd marriage Norah Robertson. 1959

Frank died 20.12.1969 in Tauranga.

 

Rosalie (Rose) Claire.

Born 6.1897 in Kaiwaiwai.

Unmarried.

Rose died 1.1.1984. In Iona Hospital New Plymouth.

 

 

Charles Francis Goodrick 2nd.

 

Was born to Charles Francis Goodrick and Jemima Smith at Kaiwaiwai Featherston, on 25.6.1873.

He married Mary Willis at her home, the residence of her father William Willis, and mother Esther ( Arden) South Featherston, on the 1.10.1901.

Her parents being born 3.4.1838 and 19.4.1839 respectively in Cheshire England.

They drew a 60 acre farm in a land ballot in Ohakea, in the Bulls district.

It was bare land so a house, cowshed, and fencing had to be built

Their children were all born at Sanson, Bulls.

Ernest Charles Goodrick, born 25(26) 7.1902.

Winifred Mary Goodrick born, 29.12.1904.

Cyril Arden Goodrick, born 2.11.1910.

Edna Joyce Goodrick born, 17.2.1913.

When they sold and moved to Hawkes Bay, they found a house and some acres at Taradale, opposite the mission.

Charles was in poor health, he had blood poisoning.

In 1915 he purchased a sheep farm at Springhill, the homestead of Joseph Tucker, who went overseas to the battlefields of France and was killed, but sheep farming was not Charles’s bent.

It was rather an unsatisfactory venture, but very happy days for the children. Ernest had left school by then.

The Goodricks sold Springhill in 1919, to Horace and Edgar Worsnop, and bought “Cornwood”, Lawn Road, Mangateretere.

(This house still exists and was sold early 2004,after being owned by grandsons of Charles Francis Goodrick, Rodney and the late Winston Goodrick.)

At “Cornwood” they were very happy again with a good herd of dairy cows. Granddad won the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society’s Cup and Medal for the reserve champion dairy cow in 1932,

The cup is held by his Grandson, Neil Macdonald.

Medal- Grade Jersey Cow in 1933 is held by his grandson Winston F Goodrick.

Medal- Reserve Champion Jersey Dairy Cow in 1935 is held by his grandson, Ewan Macdonald

Granddad bred stud Southdown sheep as well.

He grew Chinese gooseberry’s, veggie’s, gladiolas, and roses. He developed diabetes and had to inject himself with insulin everyday. He was an impatient man, would have the car ready at the back gate, seated at the steering wheel, constantly blowing the horn. Grandma and Aunty Edna would emerge a little annoyed at this usual occurrence each time there was a trip in the car.

Granddad always wore black lace up boots, on his waist coat a gold chain which is now held by Rodney Goodrick, his grandson.

Mary Goodrick died, aged 73 yrs, on 29.7.1944.

Charles Goodrick aged 80 yrs on 3.8.1953.

Both buried at the Havelock North Cemetery.

 

The Goodrick Family

 

As written by Charles Francis Goodrick 2nd.

C 1952

Found in his home at “Cornwood’ Mangateretere.

Original copy held by his grandson , Rodney Goodrick.

 

Unique history of a pioneer family, whose Grand parents arrived in NZ in the 40’s

Mother being born at Petone in 1846. daughter of Mr and Mrs Thomas Smith, later early settlers of the Wairarapa taking up virgin land there and living there and farming it for many years, until their deaths at the age , 97 and 92

Father came to NZ at the time of the Otago Gold rush.Born at Kings Lynn, Norfolk England.

Later coming to Wellington where he and a mate taking a contract to pitsaw piles for the Wellington Wharf.

Later coming to the Wairarapa and working for the late Charles Bidwell, splitting posts and putting up boundary fences for that estate. Afterwards , taking up virgin land at Kaiwaiwai and married Jemima Smith and bought up a family of 13 children, 8 girls and 5 boys. All of whom are still living with one exception, who was killed in an accident

These are now settled all over the North Island from Wellington to Auckland, and ranging in ages from 55 to 85.and all well.

Mr and Mrs Goodrick lived to the great ages of 84 and 94 dying within 5 days of each other., after celebrating their Diamond wedding a few years before.

They are buried at the Featherston Cemetery.

The family names are ,

Mr W. R .Goodrick of Cambridge.

CFG of Hastings.

Jack, killed at new Plymouth.

R of Te Puke,

F of Tauranga.

Girls,

Mrs Handley of Wellington,

Mrs T. Lyall of Wellington

Mrs Fawcett of Taranaki

Mrs. Wood of New Plymouth

Mrs Henderson of Opunaki

Miss R Goodrick of Hastings

Miss Goodrick of Featherston.

23 grandchildren

26 Great grandchildren

 

 

ERNEST CHARLES

 

Born, 25/26.7. 1902.

Married Doris Marion Thompson, on 6.1.1926.. they worked an orchard in Havelock North for a few years then moved to Tokaroa in June 1930.

Real pioneering stuff , they arrived to a 70 acre paddock.With only a cabbage tree and a water trough on it. Timber for a house was supposed to have been delivered but wasn’t, so neighbours bedded them for a couple of nights while Ernest rearranged timber delivery. They first lived in a part timber- tent arrangement till the carshed was built. Very cold of course being middle of winter, sometimes they would wake to find frost on the bedclothes.

Ernest was also instrumental in learning that cobalt was needed for the soil, as many of the farmers there before had lost everything.

Audrey Doris was born 7.11.1930

The Goodrick’s shifted to Pukekura Cambridge in 1952, dairy farming again.

Ernest enjoyed a game of golf as did Doris in the earlier days also local theatricals and singing, and bridge in the later days.

Audrey married Richard David Beveridge on 20 .12.1954.

They had 3 daughters, Sheryll, Gwynell and Jan.

Audrey and Richard lived in Cambridge in 1956.

After Ernest and Doris’s retirement they moved to Tauranga approx, 1962, where Ernest died 4.12.1969 of Heart Failure. Doris (who for many years was troubled with bad arthritis ) shifted to Auckland 1980 to her daughter Audrey.

Audrey divorced and later married Roger Hoare on 20.6.1981, and Doris continued to live with them in her own flat, till she died on 14.4.1990.

Audrey is now living in Papamoa adjacent to one of her daughters.

 

 

WINIFRED MARY,

 

Born 29.12.1904, Ohakea, Bulls.

Winifred attended Onga Onga School, where she gained a certificate of proficiency, dated 1.12.1918. aged 13 years and 9 mths.

She with her cousin Eileen Willis, was learning music, they also went to Waipawa and had pen painting lessons from a Miss Bott.

Winifred dabbled in oils later, and her family now proudly have framed paintings hanging in their homes.

While living in Springhill the Macdonald’s came to the Goodricks for parties and later Allan Macdonald married Winifred at the Methodist Church in Hastings in 26.2.1930. They began dairy farming in Carrick Road, Raupare a few miles from Hastings.

Their 5 children were born there,

Margaret Jean, 16.9.1931

Brian Allan, 3.2.1933.

Ewan Douglas, 12.6.1936

Norma Allison, 11.6.1940.

Neil Bruce, 17.6.1945.

Winifred and Allan’s children attended Twyford School, cycling 2 ½ miles on shingle road for their schooling.

Winifred and Allan were always involved in school activities and committees.

It was a happy childhood with lots of good memories of their younger days. i.e. Neddy the donkey, with his many carts, picnics at the river, taken by tractor and trailer or the old Buick truck, later on in the new 1951 Bedford K, purchased in September 1951, to the end of Carrick Road, to swim to their hearts content. With the wooden boat their dad built to paddle up and down the Ngaruroro River.

The plantation where they played for many hours, building huts, eeling in the creek and fishing for flounders in the river.

So many pets, a very patient father and a very understanding mother.

As well as supplying cream to the Heretaunga Dairy Company for butter, Allan also supplied cream to Rush Munro’s, a well known ice-cream parlour , still operating today.

Then later to Blue Moon Ice cream Manufacturers.

Allan also raised pigs, grew lucerne, cut and baled hay, grew sugar beet, the latter for fodder,

Both Margaret and Brian being married from there.

The farm sadly, was sold in 1955 and the family moved to Hapuka Street, Frimley, Hastings, where they lived in semi retirement.

They enjoyed some lovely holidays down the South Island.

Allan commencing a hay baling contracting business, as well as being in demand for building work on farms. He also grew a great veggie garden, leeks being a major crop.!!

He enjoyed walking the rivers fly-fishing for trout, fishing Lake Taupo from their boat “Kotahi” and duckshooting with his brothers. Winifred also enjoyed Woman’s Institute, then in latter years the Forest and Bird Society, Rose Society, with which they both enjoyed a 6 weeks trip to USA and Canada.

She was also a keen bowler in the Heretaunga Bowling Club with much success.

As well as having a large bright garden of her own, having time for her family and friends, there was always a smiling welcome for anyone who called at their home.

Ewan, Allison and Neil all married from this home.

Winifred died on 4.11.1977 of cardiac arrest (seconds) acute myocardial infarction (1/2 hour) coronary heart disease (5 years) at Mangakino when returning home from a bus tour of the Bay of Islands.

Allan died 19.9.1981 of cardiac arrest (seconds), coronary artery disease (years) cerebral arteriosclerosis (I year) carcinoma of the prostrate (10 months), at 316 Hapuka Street, his home in Hastings

Their ashes are in The Wall at the Hastings Cemetery

 

 

Margaret Jean,

 

Born 16.9.1931. Hastings.

Married Eric David Welch, at the Hastings Presbyterian Church on 26.11.1953.

Eric born 19.9.1930 Hastings.

They adopted 4 children, 2 girls and 2 boys. Sharyn, John, Kim, and Louise

After their marriage Margaret and Eric lived on farms, those days rent free, Eric working as a shepherd at Mangatahi, Te Hawke, Maraekakaho and finally managed a farm at Raukawa.

Their first car being a 1934 Austin 10. buying it for 240 pounds in 1952.

While living at Raukawa they bought on time payment, a new 1964 white Zephyr 6,for 1228 pounds

At this time Eric travelled to Boys High once a week to study accountancy for a year, for his own interest and stimulation.

They moved to Hastings with their 4 children, bought their own home in St Aubyn Street in 1971

Eric worked as a wool classer for 2 years at Tomoana Wool Scour. Then as Merchandise Manager at Farm Products, till in 1982 when he and Margaret bought their own business,”Margerics” in the new Westend Shopping centre, Heretaunga Street W. Hastings.

In their business, they stocked habby, knitting wool, crafts etc.

Patchwork Fabric being their main income, with classes held at the back of the shop and at Neil Macdonald’s smoko-room in Macdonald Engineering, Cooper Street, Havelock North.

Also 2 patchwork groups met weekly at Neil’s business, and at the peak of these at least 15 ladies attended, some travelling from Napier.

As well, Eric was enjoying the outdoors, as gardener for Neil ‘s home and business grounds.

They had also moved to their present home in Maraekakaho Road, a few houses from where Eric was born. The house was built on the land of Lowe’s orchard where Eric used to play with Rubin and George Low.(Later Mt Everest climber) as a child.

Eric always enjoyed tennis, bowls, table tennis, fishing, watching and following any sport on TV.

He was an active member of the Hastings Lion’s Club.

He sadly died of cancer shortly after the shop was sold.

Eric died at Cranford Hospice, on 17 January, 1999 Hastings

His ashes in the garden at the Hastings Cemetery.

Margaret is still living in their home and enjoying patchwork, and researching the family trees, of Macdonald, Goodrick, Willis and Arden families.

 

 

 

Brian Allan

 

Born 3.2.1933,

Married Phyllis Gordon on 4.6.1955, Hastings.

Phyllis born, 20.11.1933.

They had 3 children 1 girl and 2 boys, Paul, Mark and Lynn

Phyl marrying ,(after Brian’s death ), Noel Sewell. 23.9. 1995 at Omokoroa,

Brian and Phyl worked on a sheep farm at Mangatahi before going to Chamber’s sheep farm at the back of Havelock North.Then to his Uncle Jack MacDonald’s sheep and cattle farm at Tikokino for some years, before moving to Waipukarau sharemilking. A few years later , buying “Taripa” Citrus Orchards, in Lockington’s Road, Tauranga.

Phyl worked the orchard with the help of Brian while he also worked at a nearby rock quarry crushing stone for the N.Z Railways.

Brian took over the 1951 Bedford K, from his father Allan,

which he used to take his citrus fruit to market.

They sold and bought a home at Omokoroa over looking the beach,

Brian working for the council there in maintenance for the camping ground, and grass verges etc.

Later he worked as maintenance service man for his brother, N.B Macdonald Engineering, in the Bay of Plenty area.

Sometimes coming to the factory in Havelock North to work there for short terms.

He was so interested in camping holidays, skiing, voluntary fire brigade (always known as “Scotty” there amongst his mates), fishing from his various boats, campervans, visiting his son Paul in Sydney and going on more camping trips and golf.

A real MR Fixit of anything.

He bought in 1986, worked on and rebuilt a vintage 1935 Morris 8 Sports car “Kermit’.

Phyl relates how he saw one with Uncle Charlie Palmer when they were at the Hawkes Bay A.& P. Show in Hastings, and always wanted one ever since.

To her horror years later he came home with one all in bits in a big box.!!

It was transported to N .B. Macdonald Engineering in 1989 where the restoration was completed. The engine turning over first pop with a small puff of smoke.

Paul drove his mother Phyl in “Kermit” to attend Brian’s Funeral.

Meeting with his sisters Margaret and Allison and families at the annual ADM September Reunion, a must. He commented, no matter what else happened, he would always go to Taupo on the last weekend in September, even if no one else attended. This he always did, the last year being 1992, dying 2 weeks later.

Brian was really looking forward to reaching the age of 60 and applying for and receiving the superannuation. Quite a family joke especially with his brother -in -law Eric. But he didn’t make it by 4 months.

His early retirement was bought on by the detection of cancer.

Sadly, Brian died on the 12.10.1992 at his home, Omokoroa , Tauranga. Aged 59 yrs.

His ashes are at the Pyes Pa Road, Tauranga Crematorium and Cemetery.

Below as related to us by his son Mark.

Some ashes were placed under a walnut tree with a wooden plaque carved with the name “ Scotty” on Mikes farm at Allport Road, off the Te Puke Rotorua Road-SH33. Mike was one of Brian’s mates from the fire Brigade.

Brian spending a lot of happy hours tinkering on Mike’s farm during his last few years with us.

 

 

Ewan Douglas,

 

Born 12.6.1936. Hastings

Married Anne Rae Colquahoun on 3.9.1960, St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Hastings.

Anne born 30.11.1938, Waipukarau.

They had 3 children, 1 son and 2 daughters Ellen, Hugh and Deanna.

Ewan completed an apprenticeship in carpentry and joinery,

at Hugh Littles, Hastings.

Ewan enjoyed great times in his youth deerstalking in the Ruahines etc often with his Twyford mate Lester Masters, Jim and jack Hall and brother Brian.

Using Neddy, the family pet donkey as a pack horse was not very successful, mainly due to Neddy’s short legs.!! He and friend David Hicks built a boat named “We Mada” and launched it in the Napier Harbour.

Ewan owned an AJ.S motor bike, which he sold after a riding accident.

Then he bought his first car, 1948 Ford Prefect.

They worked on Elliott’s farm at Mangatahi after their marriage, moving on to Ongaonga, to Kittow’s at Takapau, to 10 acres and house in Adelaide Road Dannevirke bought a better home and 10 acres in the South of Dannevirke, where he grew lucerne for sale while working as office manager for Awe Wool Exporters. Before going share milking further south.,

Anne trained as a P.E. teacher at Palmerston North and worked in Dannevirke before her marriage and continued with this career, also working as a school councillor.

Later they moved to Mt Pirongia buying land and a house with Ewan working in the local power board office, moving to “Inverness”, Pirongia, building a home and grazing the land and growing lucerne for racehorses.

The land later to be subdivided for a housing block.

Anne was running her Natural Health Clinic from there.

In 1999 she won a trip to Salt Lake City, Utah, for topping sales in NZ selling natural products in her clinic.

From there they lived at Kinlock in a newly built home and breaking in and fencing new land.

Anne continuing with her clinic.

In 2004, Ewan took over the Bedford Truck, transporting it from Neil’s at Havelock Nth, to his home at Kinlock.

Having sold the Kinlock property, Labour weekend 2004, they have purchased a home and land at Waikeria, KihiKihi.

Ewan is storing a Pontiac car, once belonging to Uncle Jim Macdonald Springhill, Ongaonga. Uncle Jim was renowned for taking his brothers or visitors out to the carshed to the “pontie” for a nip, where he had the same kept.

In latter years Ewan had a family interest in the steam engine “Norfolk Pride”, now housed in Hamilton. Once owned by his grandad Duncan Macdonald, and used by his father, Allan Macdonald.

It was bought new by Duncan Macdonald, on it’s way from England it was on show at the Melbourne Show, in Australia before arriving at Napier in 1901. The Engine Drivers Certificate of Competency for Duncan reads,

1901, Certificate 641. as an engine driver, working locomotive engines.

 

 

Norma Allison,

 

Born 11.6.1940.

Married Edward John Brodribb, at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Hastings. 7.10.1961

Edward born 24.4.1938, in Napier.

They had 3 children, 1 daughter and 2 sons Suzanne, Stephen and Andrew.

Their second son, Andrew died at the age of 33 yrs, due to a blood clot, leaving his wife, a daughter and an unborn son.

After their marriage, Allison and Eddy started Panapa Gardens, where they grew and sold strawberry’s, some being exported.

Also they supplied crops for Watties Canneries i.e., broad beans, tomatoes, beetroot, jam strawberries etc

They grew vegetables, mainly caulis, lettuces, potatoes etc. to sell thru Slaters Auctioneers. Also supplying his brother David, with potatoes for his fish and chip shop in Hamilton.

Then it turned to custard in 1971, and the family all moved to Hamilton, to Tramway Road where Allison still lives. They helped Dave with his fish and chip shop for a time, then into Pest Control, after which Eddy returned to his original trade at John Walker Printers, working there for many years.

The family built a camp at Hikuai in the bush, with the help of friend Rowan (Wingy)then a holiday bach spending many happy weekends and holidays there over the years. A great outlook for 2 rapidly growing boys.

Fishing, swimming, pighunting and learning the skills of bushlife.

Printing chemicals became too hazardous for Eddy’s health,

(Asthma all his life). He then commenced a ”Casualty Calf Collection” business, picking up dead newborn calves and lambs from farms around the Waikato region. Delivering them to Eureka Hides and Skins for processing.

Needing oxygen via an oxygen machine helped him over the last few years of his life. While using this machine Dave and friends took him on a private bus trip to the Wanaka Air Show in the South Island, to the Bluff, returning via several beaches for fishing from a chair with his oxygen supply nearby. He enjoyed his first flight to visit his brother Dave in Melbourne a few months before he died.

Eddy died 16.12.1998 at his home in Hamilton, his sudden death at aged 60 was a shock to all.

His ashes in the garden at the Newstead Cemetery, Hamilton .

Allison worked for her son Stephen when he bought Leadlight Products, Rua St Frankton in 1983, later he relocated to larger premises, cnr Commerce and Norton Rd in October 1992 where she continued till her retirement in 2005.

 

Neil Bruce

 

Born 17.6.1945

Married Josephine Mary Pryce , 21.5.1966 at St. James Anglican Church, Duke Street, Hastings.

Jo born 10.12.1947.

They had 4 children, 2 girls and twin boys.

Fiona, Catherine, Geordie and Arden. ( twins)

Sadly, Geordie drowned at aged 18mths.

Neil passed his Fitter and Turner apprenticeship at Tourist Motors and Farming Company workshop before his marriage. He later worked for other businesses until he started up on his own in 1974, in his garage in Reynolds Road as “M.A.C. Engineering and Sheet Metals”.

Neil being the inventive one for electronic fruit graders, selling and exporting to USA, Pakistan, Australia to name a few.

25th June 1982 won the NZ National Field Day Society Award for design performance and application in Hamilton.

Later in December 1983 building a workshop, 2229 sq mts “N.B Macdonald Engineering”, as well as renting buildings across the road in Cooper Street, Havelock North.

A very successful business, with the largest industrial building in Havelock Nth. Mr Muldoon ( the then Prime Minister of NZ) and Mrs Muldoon, visited the factory in July, 1984 during their visit to Hawke’s Bay.

While still living in Reynolds Road, they built a new block home in Greenwood Road, doing most of the work themselves, then moved out to Flaxton, and finally to Falkirk, Middle Rd where he renovated a relocated home from Hastings (Gifford’s, from Avenue Road.) with the help of his factory staff.

In 1986 Neil became a member of the Havelock Nth Rotary Club.

In 1991,the Bedford K was driven to Havelock North from Tauranga. Brian having no further use for the old faithful.

He, with Neil and Margaret driving it to H.B, it’s new home.

Here it remained for 13 years in use, till it continued it’s life’s journey to his brother Ewan’s farm at Kinlock.

Was used to cart hay bales, help with farm and factory chores. Also for a bedroom and towing the “Horse float/ kitchen”, the backup vehicle for the many horse treks with family and friends, undertaken around the New Year with the Clydesdales pulling the wagons. The first trek in December 1993 and the last Jan 2004.

Neil sold his business in 1995, and later the vacant sections.

He now farms Falkirk Farm and runs Falkirk Cottage as an exclusive quintessential home stay, which he built around 2000.

He is very interested in animals, namely clydesdale horses, highland cattle, stray dogs from the pound, stray cats, bantams, an agro donkey, “Neddy” of course, bard rock hens and a vicious rooster, who between them raised numerous chicks.

A keen owner and rider of Harley Davidson motor bikes. Not forgetting his restored Oldsmobile which he acquired in 1983 and uses for home stay guests and private wine trails. NEIL HATED HIS SCHOOLDAYS .

 

 

CYRIL ARDEN

 

Born 2.11.1910.

Married Noral Matheline Guthrie on the 17.3.1938

Noral born 20.2.1909. Hatuma.

They had 2 sons. Winston and Rodney

Cyril dairy farmed at “Cornwood”, Mangateretere with Charles Francis, his father.

When first married they lived at Haumoana, and Cyril travelled back and forth to the farm daily.

Later they moved to the small house over the road from Cornwood to live, then to Cornwood, when Edna and Charles married and bought their Poultry Farm.

Their involvement was pigs, dairy cows, and cropping to feed same, plus building up a successful Southdown Stud.

Charles , lived with them till he died in 1953.

Sadly Cyril died shortly after, on 7.1.1954 from a blood clot at the early age 44.

This left Noral to cope with 2 small boys, a farm and a mortgage etc, as well as the sudden loss of a dear husband.

We understand a Mr Gray took over sharemilking for her till the boys were able to continue farming on their own,

After Noral’s death, 12.2.1972 of cancer, Winston and Rodney continued farming.

Cyril and Noral are buried at Havelock North Cemetery

 

Winston

Born 12.6.1940.

Married Gail Easterbrook 29.1.1977, Keirunga Gardens, Havelock North.

No children, later divorced.

The Goodrick Bros. topped the lamb sales at Stortford Lodge in Aug 1996 with 250 woolly male lambs $72.00 a head. Then beat that in the afternoon with 25 more woolly male lambs at $76.50 a head.

Winston died 14.11.1996 of a heart attack at his home. “Cornwood”

He is buried with his parents at the Havelock North Cemetery.

 

Rodney

Born 9.12.1941

Married Judith Anne Clare, 29.11.1975 Havelock North

Born 20.3.1953.

They had one daughter and one son, Michelle and Andrew.

Their activities consisted of cropping, orchard, and live sheep for exporting etc and always did well.

Rodney and Judith built a new home across the road, while Winston lived at Cornwood Homestead, till he died.

Rodney has continued farming both, till 2004 when he sold the Cornwood homestead block and house.

 

 

Notes from Winston Frances Goodrick. 1996

As told to Margaret Welch and roughly recorded. 2004.

 

Cornwood Home was Built c. 1910 – 1920.

Flax behind house and swamp to Whakatu.

Then in 1923 CFG. took out mortgages, over all titles, on 2 blocks and one across the road.

c.1930 part one added.

Cottage over the Lawn Road , built in c. 2nd world war years.

Lived in by the Lattimore’s and then Giles.

Goodrick’s given option to purchase, took it up.

Then purchased land over the road.

Financial burden with Grandad and Cyril .

Lawyer said “get round it”

Charles Palmer then started a poultry farm in Lumsden Road.

Potatoes were cooked and given with mash to the chooks, - HOT.!!

When Cyril died in 1954 Winston and Rodney took over the farm, had 3-4 mortgages, with Mary Nestor-Baylis.

One due for refinancing, interest rates fixed for 5 yrs, 4.5%.

Greedy (Bailey) sister wanted to double the %.

Paid back and accepted.

Went to bank, paid lot off. Mortgages released.

Coops Home came from the haunted house. known as “The Lawns” Mangateretere.

The Maids quarters went across the Tukituki River to the back of Havelock North by traction engine.

Craven A cigarettes found in lining of “Cornwood”.

 

 

EDNA JOYCE,

 

Born 17.2.1913 .

Married Charles Palmer, from Sussex England, 20.11.1948.

Charles born 31.5.1915.

They had 2 sons, Graham and Mason

Charles came out in 1946 to Wilson’s Nurseries Hastings, after being in charge of the grounds of the Ferring home of the Hon Mrs Lionel Quest, to study horticulture. After 6 years in the Army medical Corps, 2nd World War in Italy, Iraq, the evacuation of Greece, and 18 months in a hospital ship which took him to South Africa, Canada, and America.

He and Edna had met on a previous trip out and wrote to each other till his discharge.

They married and continued to live at Cornwood where Graham was born till they bought a 2 acre poultry farm in Lumsden Road Hastings, June 1950. They built it up to 1200 chickens, and doubled that in the summer.

They also bought a small truck for 75 pounds.

They sailed on the Rangitiki to England 10.2.1955, via Panama Canal to meet the Palmer family and tour England and Scotland in their new Rover car, which they took back with them to New Zealand on the Rangitoto July 1955.

Mason was born, and they continued working hard on their poultry farm till it was sold and they returned to Sussex England in November 1964.

They traveled there on the ship Oriana via Suez Canal.

Charles and Edna, in February 1965, set up a very successful pig farming unit at Lower Toat Farm, near Horsham, with the help of Graham and Mason.

Charles died of cancer on 27.8.1976, in Sussex, and is buried at Itchingfield Church , the Palmer family Church, adjacent to “Lower Toat Farm.”

His 2 sons continued, married and worked hard to maintain their lifestyle.

 

 

 

Graham Frederick,

Born 14. 9.1949

Married Alexandra (Sandra) Boyd 24.4.1976, Scotland.

Sandra was born 5.2.1946.

They had 3 sons, Charles, John and Graham.

 

 

Charles Mason

Born 16.4.1957

Married Sally Hexton, at the Church of St. John the Evangelist, Bury, Sussex. 10.9.1983.

Sally born 26.12.1959

They had 1 son and I daughter, Catherine and Robert.

 

Edna had moved to her own home in Coolham, near Horsham.

Graham, Sandra and family lived in the family home on “Lower Toat” farm

while Mason and Sally farmed nearby at “Cornwood” rearing calves etc

In 1989, Graham decided to return to NZ to live, as the bottom had dropped out of the pig market. He sold his home and some land at Lower Toat Farm and purchased a kiwi fruit orchard at Kati Kati, Tauranga, Bay of Plenty.

They sold there buying land and a home in Wrights Road, Tauranga and in 2005 sold this and bought a farm in Paeroa, intending to graze cattle and maybe grow Avocados.

Sandra with her nursing experience, has worked at an old peoples home in Kati Kati, at the Tauranga Hospital and now as a very capable and respected district nurse, also helping Graham on his orchard and land.

While Mason built a new home on the remainder of the land at “Lower Toat”. Raising pigs, then going into sheep etc.

Edna at 81 yrs kept herself busy with family, her flower garden, and long daily walks with her corgi dog, Tui.

Sadly she died on 18.2.1995, just after she had decided to return to NZ, to live with Graham, Sandra and their boys.

Later, Mason sold Lower Toat Farm and the family are now leasing a National Trust, “Wickham Manor” and farm near Winchelsea, East Sussex.

Sally also running a very successful B&B from there.

 

This article was partially written by Margaret Welch, second to eldest granddaughter who spent a great deal of time in her younger years with Grandma and Granddad Goodrick at Mangateretere.

 

Completed and written by Margaret and Allison, February 2005.